A cookie is information (a small text file) that a site saves to your web browser. Cookies make the personalization of your web experiences possible. For example, a cookie may allow sites to record your browsing activities — like what pages and content you've looked at, when you visited, and whether you clicked on an ad. Cookies can help sites remember items in your shopping cart, your log-in name, your preferences such as always showing the weather in your hometown, or your high game scores. Other cookies may be placed in your browser by third-party advertising companies to help deliver the ads you see online. These "third-party cookies" may be used to “remember” parts of your online activities in order to deliver ads tailored to your interests. For example, if you read an article online about running, a cookie may be used to note your interest in running. As you continue to surf the web, you may see coupons to save money on running shoes. Cookies are not spyware or adware, and can’t deliver viruses or run programs on your computer.

Third Party Cookies

The term "third-party" indicates that rather than having a direct relationship with a user, a company has a relationship with one or more of the websites that a user visits.  For example, if a user visits example.com, that website is the "first party."  If example.com partners with an advertising network, platform, or exchange to place ads, the network, platform, or exchange is the "third party."  The advertising network uses cookies when the user visits example.com to help it select and serve the best ad. These cookies are considered "third-party cookies."  First parties partner with third parties in this way because third parties have technology and expertise to enable more efficient ad placement across websites. 

MessageSpace, working with brands, publishers and websites, use third-party cookies to make advertising more engaging and relevant to users and more valuable to publishers and advertisers.

Did this answer your question?